Tag Archives: jobgiraffe

DevilStorm Gets Ready for FIRST Robotics Competition

We’d like to provide another update on the progress of the proudly JobGiraffe sponsored DevilStorm Robotics Team from Hinsdale Central High School. They are now in the middle of their ‘Build Season’, the 6 week long period when they must design and build their robot before it competes in the regional FIRST Robotics competition (it is called Recycle Rush and you can read all the details about it here)._DSC1775The mechanical department of the DevilStorm team has moved from designing their parts within a CAD software program (computer-animated design) to actually ordering their parts and beginning to assemble them. Of course, since they designed their parts on a computer the parts they ordered are not exactly to the specifications they need, so they had to fix these discrepancies themselves. Next, they moved onto actually manufacturing & building the subsystems of the robot, which included building a tower section with steel cable supports to create a lifting mechanism, as well as several gearboxes that allow the lifting to actually work.

_DSC1822The programming department has been working on implementing computer vision, which will essentially be what allows the robot to see and identify containers that need to be picked up during the autonomous part of the competition (in which the robot will work on it’s own without input from the team). They have also been working on the very important controllers that will be used during the part of the competition in which the team controls the robot. As you might imagine these controllers working correctly is paramount to the robot’s success.

_DSC1631The electrical department has been playing a bit of a waiting game because the parts of the already assembled robot are completely wired, meaning they are waiting for more components of the robot to be complete before more wiring is necessary. In the meantime they have been researching for the right encoders to be used on the robot, encoders that will help convert the computer’s instructions into the correct electrical signals to be sent to the mechanical components of the robot.

_DSC1610The logistics department had a big win by securing two new sponsors for the team, and they could have a third one soon as well. They have also been updating several documents related to inventory and budgeting, which then informs them on another important responsibility of theirs, parts ordering. One of the logistics department’s roles is to keep everyone else organized and on target, and it seems that they’ve been quite successful in this regard.

In other news the team has finally decided on a name for the robot, it shall be known as Stanley! We are always excited to hear the updates from the DevilStorm Robotics team, and are always impressed by the quick progress they are making in the complicated process of creating a robot from scratch in just 6 weeks time.

The team could always use additional funding as well as help from mentors, if you’d like to help you may email devilstormrobotics@gmail.com. Additionally, you can follow the team and learn more about the specifics of their progress on Facebook at http://devilstormrobotics.cmail2.com/t/t-l-tytuzl-iljrjtvt-r/ and on Twitter at http://devilstormrobotics.cmail2.com/t/t-l-tytuzl-iljrjtvt-y/.

DevilStorm Robotics Team Update

by Sean Brna

The Hinsdale Central High School robotics team, which JobGiraffe proudly sponsors and roots for, has made great progress lately. They are in the beginning of their 6 week long ‘Build Season’, in which they have to design and build their robot that will compete in the Midwest regional FIRST Robotics Competition. This year’s competition is called Recycle Rush (and you can read all the details about that here). DevilStorm’s team members have been separated into departments of sorts, meaning that certain students focus on certain components of the robot’s design, after which they then have to work together to make sure each component works well with all the others. It’s not a simple process, but progress is being made!

DevilStorm robotics, JobGiraffe

The mechanical part of the team has finished the very important CAD development stage of the building process. CAD stands for Computer-Animated-Design, meaning the students learn about, and then use, complex software so as to design the integral parts of the robot. In this picture you can see the students analyzing the design of the motor controllers for the robot, which will be the part of the robot that allows it to drive.

DevilStorm robotics team, JobGiraffe

But the robot is not all mechanical – it is also part computer! Without computerization, the robot would not be able to accomplish its intricate recycling-related goals. With the help of their mentors, as well as with help from the FIRST Coding Library, the computer part of the team has successfully simplified the programming code, which controls the computer software within their robot. This coding simplification will help their robot run in a more optimal manner related to its specific operation goals. Keep in mind that the robot must be able to run self-sufficiently, as well as be controlled by the students; meaning the efficiency of the code is quite important!

DevilStorm robotics team, JobGiraffe

The electrical side of the team has successfully connected all the motor controls to the robot, meaning it has full movement capabilities. In doing so they have also taught the younger members on the team exactly how one goes about wiring a dynamic machine such as this. One of the more complicated aspects of this process is working with the programmers, so that the code they write correctly knows how to communicate with the robot’s wiring – which is what will allow it to move and operate in exactly the way they wish it to.

DevilStorm Robotics Team, JobGiraffe

And lastly, the “driver station” has received a nifty looking laser-cut design depicting the team’s logo, which is half-robot/half-devil figure that looks very intense indeed!

We are excited to see the next steps in the ‘Build Season’, and see what the DevilStorm robot team will look like as it continues to take shape!

To follow the team and learn more about the specifics of their progress you may follow them on Facebook at http://devilstormrobotics.cmail2.com/t/t-l-tytuzl-iljrjtvt-r/ and on Twitter at http://devilstormrobotics.cmail2.com/t/t-l-tytuzl-iljrjtvt-y/.

The ‘Build Season’ Begins for the DevilStorm Robotics Team

In case you didn’t know, JobGiraffe is a proud sponsor – and fan – of Hinsdale Central High School’s robotics team, DevilStorm Robotics. They are a part of the FRC (FIRST Robotics Competition) nationwide robotics competition and will take part in the Midwest Regional Competition this spring. The aim of FRC is to inspire young people to be the future leaders within science and technology, while along the way also teaching them other useful skills such as teamwork, mentoring, fundraising, and communication. Last year, DevilStorm did quite well and won the Rookie All-Star Award for the Midwest region.

The 2015 competition officially got underway last Saturday with the announcement of this year’s challenge, which is appropriately called ‘Recycle Rush’. The team will now enter the six-week long ‘Build Season’, in which the team has to first design and prototype ideas for the robot before actually building it.

The Recycle Rush challenge is interesting in that it will challenge the robotics team to not only create a dynamic and complex machine to accomplish its tasks, but also to think about tackling a much larger issue that is important to our environment and the planet.

 

The objective is to build stacks of totes (rectangular recycling containers), and then to place recycling bins (in a traditional recycling/garbage can shape) on top of them, into which the robots will then need to ‘recycle’ litter, which will be represented by pool noodles. Two ‘alliances’ of three teams each will face off against each other in this competition within an area that measures 54’ long and 27’ wide. Within that area will be a ‘landfill zone’, an ‘auto zone’ in-between, and ‘scoring platforms’ (where the totes must be stacked to receive points).

Each 2 minute and 30 second match begins with a 15 second autonomous period, in which the robot must operate independently of any human input. The remaining 2 minutes and 15 seconds are called the Teleop Period. During this time, the robots are controlled remotely by the student drivers. The three teams of each alliance must work together to place as many totes on their scoring platforms as possible. There is the additional twist that recycling containers at greater heights earn an alliance more points. An alliance can also earn points by disposing of their litter in either their landfill zone or by placing litter in or on scored recycling containers. If you leave any un-scored litter marked in the other alliance’s color on your side of the field it will be considered unprocessed and not properly disposed of, resulting in points for the other alliance. An alliance can also earn ‘Cooperation Points’ through coordinating well with the other alliance in the match, which may seem counter intuitive at first, but really does reflect the fact that recycling is something we all benefit from.

What’s clear is that there are many different ways to receive points, or to make each piece of litter moved more valuable. This means that a complex and well thought out strategy will be necessary; in addition to teamwork and building a robot that can actually do the hard work. These students have a lot on their hands!

We are happy to hear that the DevilStorm team has already begun to brainstorm and share their ideas for their robot and have even begun designing and prototyping ideas. And that is just after one week of knowing what the competition would be! They have brought on an engineering teacher to their team, along with an FRC team alum, which are smart moves that should help them to improve upon last year’s success.

JobGiraffe would like to re-iterate that we are very proud of the DevilStorm robotics team and are very happy to again be one of their sponsors as they go into the 2015 competition. If you’d like to learn more about the FRC Robotics Competition and how you can get involved (as a volunteer, sponsor, mentor or donator) you can learn more at http://www.usfirst.org/roboticsprograms/frc/get-involved. We will continue to provide updates on the team and their robot as we get closer to competition time.

Good luck to you DevilStorm!

Dear Lilly: Good news to report about the Gender Wage Gap!

Does the name Lilly Ledbetter ring a bell? Probably not; I would bet that less than half the people in the U.S. know who the courageous Ms. Ledbetter is. But if you ask anyone on the street “who makes more money – men or women?” the answer would resoundingly be “men” – and that answer is right.

Karen Rae Horwitz, JobGiraffe, jobs, job hunting, resumes, applying for a job,
Karen Rae Horwitz

In 1979, Lilly Ledbetter was hired by Goodyear; she retired in 1998 and then sued the company for paying her significantly less than her male counterparts. The lawsuit eventually reached the Supreme Court, which denied her claim because she did not file suit 180 days from her first paycheck even though she said she didn’t know about the disparity at the time. In dissent, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg wrote:

Lilly Ledbetter was a supervisor at Goodyear Tire and Rubber’s plant in Gadsden, Alabama, from 1979 until her retirement in 1998. For most of those years, she worked as an area manager, a position largely occupied by men. Initially, Ledbetter’s salary was in line with the salaries of men performing substantially similar work. Over time, however, her pay slipped in comparison to the pay of male area managers with equal or less seniority. By the end of 1997, Ledbetter was the only woman working as an area manager and the pay discrepancy between Ledbetter and her 15 male counterparts was stark: Ledbetter was paid $3,727 per month; the lowest paid male area manager received $4,286 per month, the highest paid, $5,236.

Subsequently, Congress passed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act in 2009 to loosen the timeliness requirements for the filing of a discrimination suit so long as any act of discrimination, including receipt of a paycheck that reflects a past act of discrimination, occurs within the 180 day period of limitations.

Thanks to Lilly, there has been progress. And I have some good news to share here and now. Let’s take a look at the millennial generation’s gender wage gap.

A very interesting report came out last year. Two companies, PayScale and Millennial Branding, released an interesting study of the state of the millennial worker. Here are some of the findings related to the gender wage gap and what they may mean.

After taking into account job factors (title, experience, industry, etc.) the millennial wage gap between men and women is 2.2%. That’s compared to 3.6% for Generation X and 2.7% for baby boomers. Overall it is a positive sign that we are inching closer to pay equality among the sexes.

While part of this change may be attributable to a positive adjustment towards viewing men and women equally in the workplace, it also is a reflection of the advancement women have made in attaining education in recent years. Of those currently working aged 25-32, 38% of women have a Bachelor’s degree, compared to 31% of men. Among younger millennials (aged 18-24) women also make up a higher percentage of those that are currently enrolled in college (45% compared to 38% in 2012).

As the economy finally begins to approach it’s pre Great Recession employment levels and companies begin to hire more millennials for the 9 million jobs that were lost, it would make perfect sense that the wage gap would close if women are, on balance, the more educated group. But keep this in mind; analysis of past generations shows that gender pay inequality increases over time the higher up the “corporate ladder” one climbs (currently, at the executive level the wage gap is 4.9% among millennials, 6.2% for baby boomers and 7.4% for Generation Xers).

The end of the Great Recession is undoubtedly good for all, including millennials, as job seekers now have increased leverage, which means they have the ability to ask for a higher starting salary. A higher starting salary affects one’s earning pace for an entire career! Yet, for those millennials who entered the work force during the Great Recession, the bitter truth is they entered the work force when they had much less bargaining power. Many have addressed this issue by being much more open to changing companies and careers, with 45% of millennials saying that the ideal length to stay with an employer before leaving for a new job is around two to three years, while 41% of baby boomers believe it should be 5 or more years before one considers leaving.

What’s the takeaway for millennials, in terms of gender and salaries? While we won’t debate here whether it’s better that millennials are open to leaving a company quicker than previous generations, it is clear that if you are a millennial who is looking to switch companies – or are entering the workforce for the first time – you should not be afraid to attempt to negotiate a higher starting salary as your leverage has increased. For women millennials this is even more true; you should not be afraid to ask for the highest appropriate starting salary possible – and know that you should continue this attitude as you progress throughout your career – as education as well as hiring trends are clearly on your side!

While it is encouraging to see that the gender wage gap is decreasing within the millennial generation, it isn’t yet equal, so it is clear that women within the generation will need to keep fighting for it. They will need to fight for it when first hired, as well as when it comes to raises and promotions throughout their career.

Ms. Ledbetter, we are on our way, but we are not there yet.

Karen Rae Horwitz
President, JobGiraffe

Karen Rae is President of JobGiraffe, formerly Paige Personnel Services, where she has guided her company through up and down economies for more than 20 years, advising both employers and job seekers on employment trends and challenges, and the strategies to meet them. She can be reached at KRH@JobGiraffe.com. 

Job Requirements Aren’t Fact: In Fact, They’re Often Fiction!

Hockey superstar Wayne Gretzsky once famously said, “You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take.”

Karen Rae Horwitz, JobGiraffe, jobs, job hunting, resumes, applying for a job,
Karen Rae Horwitz

This adage can also be applied to your job search. The unfortunate thing is that most job seekers often view themselves as unqualified for positions, when they actually are well qualified. By not applying, they deprive themselves of even the chance to be considered for the position.

After many, many years in recruiting and staffing, I feel this is not the correct way to approach a job search because frequently hiring managers, especially when writing a job description, list too many requirements and tend to include the experience and skills that they’d want the ideal candidate to have, as opposed to listing the core abilities that would actually lead to one being considered for the position.

Sound familiar?

OK, in defense of employers for just one moment, it is partly understandable; why wouldn’t an employer try to hit a home run and find that “perfect” candidate? Yes, there is a chance that the perfect person is out there, but the problem becomes these well-intended ‘top talent scouts’ inadvertently alienate and intimidate the really good, really qualified candidates!

This has actually become a substantial problem, as a recent Harvard Business Review study concluded that 41% of women and 46% of men report that feeling as if they are unqualified for a position is the number one reason they won’t even just send in their resume for consideration. They express sentiments like, “I didn’t think they would hire me since I didn’t meet the qualifications, and I didn’t want to waste my time and energy.”

It is never a waste of time or energy to apply for a job!

As recently explained in a similar GovExec.com article, “Hiring managers get overexcited and list too many things, even though only a few parts of the description are truly core. But the term “requirement” gets read very literally, and scares people off from jobs they could well get.” The author continues to say that people often forget how much of the hiring process is a human experience. This is a fact that should never be overlooked; you can often make up for not meeting certain requirements by bringing other things to the table. A steady work history, applicable education, strong references, prior professional accomplishments, a trainable nature and the right personality for a certain company culture; these things influence hiring managers just as much as your quantifiable skills!

At JobGiraffe we deal with this reality all the time. We often have to curtail the long “wish lists” from employers when writing our public job descriptions, understanding that by really only focusing on the core requirements we will actually be able to see more and better qualified applicants. We’d rather interview people to ascertain the totality of both their actual work experience and their unquantifiable qualities when deciding if they may be a good fit for a position.

But beyond JobGiraffe, the truth is, daunting job descriptions may not change, but your actions can!

Reconsider those positions you didn’t apply to because you felt you didn’t have the listed requirements. Even if it’s something that is seemingly concrete, such as a certain type of degree that’s being required. If you have the same experience and skills but not the right type of degree, do you really think an employer wouldn’t be willing to consider you for a position? Feeling like you could contribute to the success of the company will trump any kind of “perfect applicant wish list”.

A final side note; interestingly enough, women and men differ greatly in how often they let a fear of under qualification effect what jobs they apply to. Is it said that men apply for a job when they meet 60% of the qualifications, but women only apply if they feel they meet 100% of them.

This is an important lesson that all job seekers should learn; job descriptions are not rules written in stone, just wishful guidelines of the employer. Most all of us harbor a fear of being rejected, which is very normal, but when you let this fear effect how you job search you are only doing yourself a disservice.

Remember what “The Great One” said – “you miss 100% of the shots that you don’t take”, and you won’t get a job that you don’t apply to!

Karen Rae Horwitz
President
JobGiraffe

DevilStorm Prepares for its Next Challenge

JobGiraffe, Chicago's leading recruiting and staffing company, sponsors the DevilStorm robot building team.
Members of the Mechanical Division brainstorm ideas for a drive train, the system that moves the entire robot. Ideas that seem promising at this stage can be made into a CAD (Computer Aided Design) file so that the proportions can be tweaked and a prototype can be made.

It’s autumn, and those of you caught up in football and the start of NHL hockey and the NBA may not be aware of it, but robotics season is almost here.

For DevilStorm Robotics, the JobGiraffe sponsored team from Hinsdale Central High School, the new “Build Season” will kickoff on January 3, 2015, when the FRC (FIRST Robotics Competition) announces this year’s challenge. Every year is a different game, requiring robots with different skills and abilities. Once the DevilStorm team finds out the new challenge, they have six weeks to build and test a robot designed to play the new game.

The DevilStorm team is broken up into different divisions, Programming, Mechanical, Electrical, etc., each responsible for a different phase of the completed robot. The team is now in “pre-season”, with members from last year sharpening and adding to their skills while teaching new members what they need to know to contribute to the project. Pre-season is also the time for fund raising and applying for grants.

JobGiraffe, Chicago's leading recruiting and staffing company,  sponsors high school robot building team
Sophie, from the Electrical Division, diagramming an electrical scheme

For now, the team meets every Tuesday, but once Build Season starts, it will be every day for six weeks until their robot is complete.

Everyone at JobGiraffe is excited about our sponsorship of the DevilStorm Robotics team and is anticipating a great season!

Death By Interview

by Karen Rae Horwitz, President, JobGiraffe

She had superior experience…death by interview, karen horwitz
He had terrific skills…
And now… they’re lost forever.

Such a shame.

Do we know what killed them? (Or at least what killed our client’s chances for hiring either of these great candidates?)

Death by INTERVIEW (gasp)!

Death by Interview is a malady that was first noted in 2009. Yes, companies were laying off and firing far more people than they were hiring, but in those few instances where an opening existed, the first signs of this serious condition were being seen.

Offers that were once made following a second interview were suddenly absent. Then, at the third interview, a small sensation of repetition was observed, followed by an increase in unnecessary pain on the fourth interview. Uncertainty set in during the fifth interview and by the sixth meeting it was too late – the patient or, excuse me, candidate, couldn’t be saved. Any sense of excitement or enthusiasm for the position, or desire to join the team or admiration for the firm itself, was crushed. The candidate’s only hope was to take another job!

As President of JobGiraffe for over 20 years, much of my time is spent studying the numbers – statistics that have held true, for the most part, year after year even through wild economic gyrations. Yet in 2009 something was different. Suddenly the amount of interviews required to produce an offer took a startling jump and even more shocking, all of these interviews were not resulting in an accepted offer!

My staff watched many great candidates walk away from great positions because the process our clients were putting them through had just become too long. What was accomplished by asking a candidate to return 7 different times to meet 7 different people? Were HR managers and/or department heads simply too afraid to make a hiring mistake?  Did more visits mean a better hire?

The epidemic continued unidentified until I read an article last year by Dr. John Sullivan that put a name to the crisis.  Dr. Sullivan’s article accurately pointed out all the symptoms we had been observing – plus, it also noted more visits did not make a better hire, and frequently resulted in no hire at all.

Dr. Sullivan cites Google as a firm that has justifiably earned a reputation of demanding a double-digit number of interviews. Its justification was that because hiring impacts everyone that the new hire interacts with, “everyone at the firm should be able to interview a candidate.”

Fortunately, its well-earned Death By Interview reputation forced Google to eventually conduct internal research that demonstrated that “after four interviews, you get diminishing returns.” And since Google is interviewing for positions that require advanced skills and innovation, it’s time to realize that for most jobs, any number beyond three interviews is probably unnecessary.

The JobGiraffe staff had been alerting our clients to the dangers of this disease all along, but sadly, not all took action quickly enough, and some candidates were still needlessly lost.  But, as we prepare to close 2014 and the job market continues to heat up, great candidates are getting harder and harder to find, and the most talented individuals will not tolerate this unnecessary practice.

It’s obvious that employers are simply going to have to face the hard truth of the hiring environment and come to decisions earlier in the process or face losing the best candidates. Therefore, I confidently predict that this outbreak of ‘Death By Interview’ will be cured very soon.

Karen Rae Horwitz is President of JobGiraffe and is a noted expert on recruiting, staffing, and employment issues. Formerly Paige Personnel Services, JobGiraffe has offices in Chicago, Downers Grove, Schaumburg, and Vernon Hills, Illinois. 

Karen Rae can be reached at KRH@JobGiraffe.com.

Hinsdale Central’s DevilStorm Robotics Team Celebrates a Successful Season…

Last season, the JobGiraffe sponsored DevilStorm Robotics team from Hinsdale Central High School competed in early April at the Midwest Regional Competition at the UIC Pavilion and later that month at the World Championships at the Edward Jones Dome in St. Louis.

At the Midwest Regional Competition, the DevilStorm team was on the winning alliance for 6 of the 12 matches in which they competed and was ranked 29th out of the 54 teams that were present. They also received the Rookie All-Star Award for the Midwest Region. At the World Championships, DevilStorm Robotics was one of 400 robotics teams competing in 4 divisions and were on the winning alliance for 2 of the 10 games they played.

DevilStorm Team Receiving Awards at Midwest RegionalThe DevilStorm Robotics team is pictured above at the Midwest Regional holding the Rookie All-Star trophies they received at the awards ceremony.

Congratulations to everyone involved with the DevilStorm Robotics team. These kids know how to Reach Higher!

The Fantastic Fundraising Efforts of our own Deb Gates

Deb Gates has been a member of the JobGiraffe team since 1999 working as a recruiting and staffing consultant in our Vernon Hills office. She also is an active fundraiser for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, and has recently been recognized for her good work in the Chicago Tribune’s suburban online publication (you may find the article about her here). We are very proud of her annual leadership and participation in fundraisers for MS research and would like to commemorate her here, as well as share a little bit of her story.

Deb was diagnosed with MS back in February of 2004 while working with JobGiraffe (which was then known as Paige Personnel Services). Within just a few months of receiving her diagnosis she decided to become actively involved in fundraising for Walk MS, which supports the research of this disease (which, in short, interrupts the flow of information in one’s central nervous system) and affects roughly 2.3 million worldwide. She then made participating in Walk MS a yearly event, and recruited family and friends to participate with her. She just was involved in the most recent walk, which held on May 4th at Attea Middle School in Glenview.

As Deb explained in her Chicago Tribune article, “Walk MS is important to help fund scientific research and to also give back to those in the Greater Illinois MS Community who need assistance… I’m very appreciative of those who spend countless hours fundraising on our [MS patients] behalf as well as those who are involved in organizing the event.”

Deb Gates MS Walk Fundraising
Deb Gates and Laura Immergluck at Walk MS

But the best part is that Deb didn’t stop there. In 2012, when Deb’s family wasn’t able to join her for Walk MS, she created and organized her own bowling fundraising event. How impressive is that!? That year they raised $3,000 for the National MS Society. However, this past year she outdid her self and her bowling fundraising event raised $3,500.

Not only did Deb annually become involved in Walk MS but she has now orchestrated her own annual fun-centric bowling fundraisers that seem poised to raise more and more funds each year. Fundraising for research for MS is essential, as it is a disease that takes on numerous forms for different people and is a disease for which unfortunately there is no known cure.

We are proud of Deb, how she has stayed positive and not let her diagnosis affect her daily life much, and how she immediately began to be involved in fundraising for research for a cure – and has continued to do so for a decade now. We are also proud that the Chicago Tribune online recognized her efforts!

If you would like to know more about Walk MS or donate online just contact The Walk MS Team at 312.423.1156 or at walkmsillinois@nmss.org, or you may visit walkMSillinois.org.

Meet Hinsdale Central’s DevilStorm Robotics Team & Their Creation, Shannon

Robot bannerThis is an interesting story that occurs at the crossroads of education, robotics, competition, and of course – fun. JobGiraffe is a proud sponsor of the inaugural Hinsdale Central FIRST robotics team. They are technically FIRST Robotics Team # 4979, but they proudly go by the name of DevilStorm Robotics (click here to check out their Facebook page).

 

Devil Storm Robot JobGiraffe

A little explanation, the FIRST Robotics Competition is a multi-national competition for high school students. The students work side-by-side with scientists, engineers and teachers with the aim of building their own robot. They build the robot while trying to solve an specific engineering design problem/challenge in a competitive and engaging manner – namely a sports-like competition (which is meant quite literally, the competition occurs in a basketball stadium filled with people who are ardently cheering their favorite robot and team on). As explained on the FIRST Robotics Competition website; each team is given a “Kit of Parts,” a common set of rules, limited resources and time constraints. The teams are then challenged to design, build, and program a 120 lb. robot to perform the tasks of that season’s “game” (to see a demonstration of the specifics of how the game works please check out the video below the article). The students also gain the valuable skills of fundraising, designing a team “brand,” and honing their teamwork skills.

DevilStorm’s robot is named Shannon and she is a quick and nimble little machine. She is designed to not only maneuver the court of the game, which is called Aerial Assist, but to also throw a ball into one of two different “goals” (one of which is higher, resulting in more points), and to use her bumpers and speed to try and stop the other team’s robots from making any goals themselves. You can also get points for assists, or moving into the other teams space, successfully passing the ball to robot on your team, and for a variety of other Robot team photofeats (again, the video below explains the specifics of game the best). Each match is split into two different sections, an autonomous part and a human-controlled part. The exciting part about all of this is that Shannon was successfully designed to play this game all on her own, without any input from humans, as well as to be remote controlled. Now that’s impressive!

We are proud to announce that the DevilStorm Robotics team recently competed in their first robotics competition, the Midwest Regional FIRST Robotics Competition. They ended up being on the winning alliance/team for 6 of the 12 qualification matches. Even more impressively they were awarded the Rookie All-Star Award for the Midwest region! Because of this they have been invited to the World Championship Competition that will be held in St. Louis at the end of April. In St. Louis there will be approximately 400 teams, invited from around the world. It’s clearly a large honor to be invited, especially as a rookie team.

We at JobGiraffe are very proud of DevilStorm Robotics team and their fantastic achievement in being awarded the Rookie All-Star Award! If you’d like to see more pictures, or to contact the team for potential sponsorship, please visit their facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/devilstormrobotics.

Good luck to Shannon at the World Championship Competition, we’ll be rooting for you!